MT 21-40

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MT 021

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"No. 21: This figure has hanging levers A which are internally applied to the cross-poles at B and thus side C becomes lighter; if, however, the lowermost lever is not periodically raised up out of its position and into C, as has already happened at C in the illustration, it remains in its old position."

- Johann Bessler


MT_021 Discussion

MT 022

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"No. 22: This lever-thing appears to be good. From A in the center hang the large levers B. Small wheels are fastened at C, over which pass cords to the lever-weights D, which are thereby drawn up and thus the side at E becomes heavier. I have misgivings about many of the scrawls in the figure, and I will not yet make the rest of my thoughts known."

- Johann Bessler


MT_022 Discussion

MT 023

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"No. 23: This is the principle from 21 and is rightly called improved: A are hanging levers on the ends of which, B, is a small lead or iron wheel instead of the weight. Side C appears to be the heaviest, and the weight-wheels B are supposed to lift themselves around at Din a circular channel, by which means side E becomes lighter periodically. Contemplation and consideration reveal what can happen here."

- Johann Bessler


MT_023 Discussion

MT 024

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"No. 24: This invention ought not to be scorned. It consists of separate levers with weights. Between the weights are small iron poles with screw threads. The poles fall inward when the levers close. There is something one must learn first before one can grasp and correctly understand the good quality of the invention."

- Johann Bessler


MT_024 Discussion

MT 025

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"No. 25: This is the previous model except for some differences. It is sketched with longer poles. There is something misleading about the diagram, for the poles, when coming out, must not project so far out but must bend somewhat further inwardly. There is more to it than one supposes; one must study the diagram extensively."

- Johann Bessler


MT_025 Discussion

MT 026

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"No. 26: This is somewhat different from the previous model, but it can be described simply: A are levers which are interrupted at B and equipped with weight-wheels at C. The weight-wheels run in a channel E and are attached to the cords D. As the diagram shows, one side is heavier than the other. Behind this problem one looks for an augmented problem."

- Johann Bessler


MT_026 Discussion

MT 027

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"No. 27: This is the previous model slightly larger and altered: A are the levers interrupted at B and having a heart-weight at C, and D are the straps, or cords, and chains. It needs no further, lengthier explanation. This view shows what the thing might do if several things of this sort were placed next to one another along an axle-shaft."

- Johann Bessler


MT_027 Discussion

MT 028

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"No. 28: In this figure, A is a wheel with cogs almost like a balance wheel in a clock. In the center of the axle at B are orderly arms. At C is a side lever which raises the above long weight-pole E by means of D. On this pole is a thrust-lath F which, by the double movement of two wheels G and H, forcefully pushes the cogs of wheels A 4 times with each revolution. Thus the thrust upon the edge of the wheel should be much stronger than the force which the arms on the axle require. The rest is left to speculation."

- Johann Bessler


MT_028 Discussion

MT 029

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"No. 29: This is the previous principle except for one small change. A is the main wheel. B is the cylinder with 2 arms. C is an arm of a large Winkelhaken [Literally, "angle-hook," this German word was used in the printing trade to mean "justifier" or "composing stick." -Translator's note.] which is movable above at D and at E pulls a cord F. F turns a small wheel G from which a weight hangs below at H. On G is a catch I which thrusts twice into the cogs of the large wheel with each revolution and thus should cause the movement. At this point one should be able judge what to do with this thing or what to make of it."

- Johann Bessler


MT_029 Discussion

MT 030

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"No. 30: This is another lever invention. A is a figure of a half transverse-wheel. B are the main levers. C are small lifting arms on the axle which are pressed down under a small wheel D. At the center, E, of this small wheel, over a tiny wheel, by means of a cord at F, through a chain G the large arms are raised up, the lowermost up to the axle and the other up to H. In the subordinate figure one sees the levers project onto side 1; thus the side at K is seen to be heavier, and that at L, lighter. The hand at M indicates, for best understanding, the pressing down of the lifting lath, which raises the large lever. Whether this invention is good and whether the lath at E below the small wheel can be forced, pressed and raised up may be judged by those who know about friction."

- Johann Bessler


MT_030 Discussion


MT 031

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"No. 31: This is a figure with two reversed long levers A at the ends of which are weights. The levers are connected to the center of the axle at B by means of a cord which raises the upper levers C C. By means of the cord D the lower levers E are raised toward the axle. There is more to this invention than the mere drawing, which only presents or indicates the problem. The rest is left to commentators to make of the thing what they will."

- Johann Bessler


MT_031 Discussion


MT 032

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"No. 32: This is a combination of the two previous figures. What is intended by it is easily understood. A is the wheel's center under which the laths B incline and the lever C is raised by means of a cord D. This invention or figure has a good external appearance, but one must look at the end of description No. 30."

- Johann Bessler


MT_032 Discussion


MT 033

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"No. 33: This is exactly the previous model, except that instead of the central bevel-wheel it is equipped with doubled long levers by means of which the short levers A are brought up to the superior weight and the center B is brought down. It is not necessary to speculate much on this figure, for the diagram itself says what it will do."

- Johann Bessler


MT_033 Discussion


MT 034

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"No. 34: This model is easy to understand from the figure. Here A presents the machine in profile. At B are 2 long levers with weights suspended from the ends C. The levers are lifted toward the center by cords at D, which lift the upper weights E over small wheels up and outwards, and by other cords at F which lift the lower weights G up and inwards. At this point the reader is free to speculate as he pleases and to explore his thoughts on the matter."

- Johann Bessler


MT_034 Discussion


MT 035

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"No. 35: This is precisely the previous model, and only the 2 side-wheels, which lie horizontally, are to be observed, one needs no letters or explanations because the drawing itself clearly shows how the thing is constituted. Deliberation or judgment is left to the mind of each reader."

- Johann Bessler


MT_035 Discussion


MT 036

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"No. 36: The intent of this figure is clearly expressed. AA shows the 2 connected long levers with weights. At BB the levers swing a weight-lever D from below up to E by means of a chain over 2 wheels. The secondary drawing shows a distant view of the thing. Each reader must infer as much as he can."

- Johann Bessler


MT_036 Discussion


MT 037

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"No. 37: This invention belongs among Nos. 14,15 and 16. It is inserted here only because it slipped past the beginning. AA are movable levers on a belt, each of which has an oval disk fastened to it on the heavy side where the lever is attached. Other oval disks can be drawn to the first disk or pulled away from it by the known method. These disks should be considered a problem rather than an axiom

"

- Johann Bessler


MT_037 Discussion


MT 038

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"No. 38: This is based on the previous principle but instead of oval discs it has stork's bills or student- forceps. At A the stork's bills pull apart from one another, and at B they draw together to C by means of the levers D and E; this side is therefore the heaviest. There is more to this invention than there is to the previous one, but here is not the place to show the correct application of the stork's bills."

- Johann Bessler


MT_038 Discussion

MT 039

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"No. 39: This is a very special style of the stork's-bill invention. Side A is heavy. At B, over wheels, the following area C is raised up to E. At D the figure is contracted, and the corresponding side is lighter."

- Johann Bessler


MT_039 Discussion


MT 040

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"No. 40: This is a somewhat different stork' s-bill invention. The weight-levers A pull up figures B –which have the joining point at C- and also pull up the weights D by means of the poles E. The figures correspond in the center at F; thus it becomes light at G and heavy above at the superior weight. Whoever thinks it proper can construct these figures on an axle."

- Johann Bessler


MT_040 Discussion

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41 - 60

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101 - 120

121 - 143

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